Look at how the 1st ANC National Conference in 1991 shaped out

The African National Congress (ANC) is set to elect President Jacob Zuma’s successor in December during the party’s 54th National Conference.

With the race for presidency of the ANC shaping up to be a tight two-horse race between Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa and former African Union Commission head Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, we take a look at how the first ANC National Conference in 1991 shaped out.

In July 1991, the ANC held its first National Conference within the borders of South Africa.  The Conference was held just over a year after the ANC got unbanned. The organization had been operating in exile and underground for 30 years, from 1959-1990.

The conference which was held in Durban from 2nd -6th  July, was attended by almost 3000 delegates and some 500 international guests, and debated a number of issues facing the country and the organisation’s role in determining its future; during the conference the following the chosen to be the top office bearers.

President: Nelson Mandela,

Deputy President: Walter Sisulu,

National Chairperson: Oliver Tambo,

Secretary General: Cyril Ramaphosa,

Deputy Secretary General: Jacob Zuma.

Ramaphosa and Dlamini-Zuma are currently in a tight race for presidency, while other presidential contenders, including Mathews Phosa, Jeff Radebe, Lindiwe Sisulu, Baleka Mbete and Zweli Mkhize, are all competing for a distant third.

In a rally which was held in Sekhukhuneland, Limpopo, Ramaphosa upped his pace and announced the ideal candidates for his “winning” team. He chose:

Deputy President: Naledi Pandor,

Secretary General: Senzo Mchunu,

National Chairperson: Gwede Mantashe,

Treasurer General: Paul Mashatile.

Dlamini is yet to announce her ideal candidates; however the ANC Youth League (ANCYL) has made suggestions of who they want to be part of the top six when Dlamini-Zuma is the ANC president. They chose:

Deputy President: Didi Mabuza,

Secretary General: Ace Magashule,

National Chairperson: Nathi Mthethwa,

Treasurer General: Maite Nkoane-Mashabane.

At the moment the two provinces, KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo are contrasting fortunes for Ramaphosa and Dlamini-Zuma, however it is still unclear of who will win the ANC presidency.

The winner will be known after the Conference which will be held in Gauteng from 16th-20th December 2017.

 

 

 

 

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ANCYL disappointed over Ramaphosa’s use of “divisive remarks”

The African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL has slammed ANC Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa for using “divisive remarks – “winning team”, during his pronouncement of who he prefers to be top office bearers.

ANCYL National Spokesperson, Njabulo Nzuza said they were disappointed by Ramaphosa’s move, as it will divide the organisation further.

“It is not recorded anywhere in the history books of the ANC that the Presidential hopeful took a podium and pronounced names of his preferred candidates to lead with him/her and titled that a “ winning” team,” said Nzuza

“Cde Ramaphosa is the first and hopefully he is the last to utter such divisive statements. The ANCYL [request] advises Cde Ramaphosa to desist from using such divisive language of “winning” teams in the ANC. The people that he mentioned as his “winning” team must also distance[d] themselves from such a divisive title. In the ANC there are no winning teams. The ANC is a unitary organization and the winner remains the ANC,” added Nzuza.

On Sunday, during a rally which was held in Sekhukhuneland, Limpopo, Ramaphosa announced the ideal candidates for his “winning” team.

The Spokesperson condemned Ramaphosa’s pronouncement by saying it demonstrated his ‘desperation’ to lead.

“By pronouncing his so-called “winning” team, the Presidential hopeful Cde Ramaphosa demonstrated his hunger to lead at all costs even if his utterances can cause the disunity of the organization. Cde Ramaphosa has stooped so low by purporting that there is a winning team in the ANC and thus suggesting that there is also a losing team,” said Nzuza.

Meanwhile, earlier this year, the League released a statement where they also pronounced who their ideal candidates of top office bearers are. They ANCYL chose Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma as President, Didi Mabuza as Deputy President, Ace Magashule as Secretary General, Nathi Mthethwa as National Chairperson, Maite Nkoane-Mashabane as Treasure General and Jesse Duarte to remain as deputy secretary-general.

 

1st ANC Presidents

The African National Congress (ANC) is set to elect President Jacob Zuma’s successor in December during the party’s National Police and Elective Conference.

With Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa and Nkosazana Dlamini being touted as the possible candidates to succeed Zuma, below is the history of the first ANC presidents together with its wing, the ANC youth League and ANC Women’s League.

John Langalibalele Dube

John_L_Dube_001

Dube was the founding President of the South African Native National Congress (SANNC) which later was renamed as the African National Congress (ANC) in 1923.

He was born in 1871 on the 11th of February in KwaZulu-Natal. He was later taken to America by missionaries and became a student at Oberlin College, a private liberal arts college in the United States.

Dube was a South African essayist, philosopher, educator, politician, publisher, editor, novelist and poet. He died on the 11th of February in 1946 at the age of 75.

Anton Muziwakhe Lembede

Anton Muziwakhe Lembede

Lembede was a South African Activist and the founding President of the African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL).

He was born in 1914 on the 21st of January in KwaZulu-Natal. In 1933 Lembede became a student at Adams College and studied for a certificate as a “Native Higher Primary Teacher”, he then graduated in 1936.

Lembede then became a teacher and also pursued a Bachelor of Arts Degree, where he majored in Philosophy and Roman law. He also enrolled at the University of South Africa (UNISA) for a Law Degree, which he completed in 1942 and registered for a Masters Degree in Philosophy in 1943.

He died on the 30th of July in 1947 at the age of 33.

Charlotte Maxeke

charlotte_maxeke

Maxeke was the founding President of the Bantu Women’s League which later became part of the ANC and was renamed the African National Congress Women’s League (ANCWL).

She was born in 1871 on the 7th of April in Limpopo. In 1894 she travelled to Canada and the United States with the African choir which toured the England. She was then offered a scholarship by the Wilberforce University in Ohio.

In 1901 Maxeke graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree and became the First Black South African woman to receive a college degree.

She died on the 16th of October in 1939 at the age of 68.

ANCYL accuses Gordhan and Ramaphosa of exploiting SAA

The African National Congress Youth League (ANCYL) accused Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan and Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa of plotting to collapse the South African Airways (SAA) and creating space for private business.

ANCYL Spokesperson Mlondi Mkhize said Ramaphosa and Gordhan are directly influencing the airline to benefit companies they have interests in.

Mkhize also said when SAA was moved from the Public Enterprises Department to Treasury, Gordhan appointed a consultant which instructed the airline to take everything to Bidvest.

“The first he does, he tell SAA that it must take every other thing to a company called Bidvest, who is at Bidvest,?” questioned Mkhize.

“Amongst those that we know is at Bidvest is the deputy president of the ANC and that of our government, Comrade Cyril Ramaphosa. But who else is there? It is the minister himself, Pravin Gordhan,” added Mkhize.

Mkhize then touched on the issue that the airline has resolved to close its lucrative, saying this call was made to benefit other airlines.

“You are told that SAA must close some of its routes and among those routes are the most lucrative routes which include the London route, and who must take over these routes? We are safely aware that it is Comair,” said Mkhize

“Who owns Comair? Who are the stakeholders at Comair? It is Bidvest and Comrade Pravin who owns nothing less than 20% of Comair,” added the Spokesperson.

ANCYL President Collen Maine said it should be known that they are not accusing Gordhan and Ramphosa of corruption.

“We’ve never said anybody is corrupt, but we are saying that people are conflicted, hence we are saying that SAA should go back to the Public Enterprises Department,” said Maine

ANC secretary general Gwede Mantashe reacted to the allegation said he won’t “get into the mud with people that use silly season to throw mud at each other”.

On the other hand, Ramaphosa’s office denied the allegations and said the Deputy President doesn’t have any share at Bidvests.